There Never Seems to be ‘Enough Time’

Once upon a time (1.5 months ago), I was working a full-time desk job. I was spending “all of my time” at work. When I wasn’t at work, I was thinking about work. When I wasn’t thinking about work, I was dreaming about work (yes, scary). It seemed my life was ruled by this work. I enjoyed the field I was in, but not the work I did. It ate up “too much” of my time and left me “no time” for anything else I wanted to do.

Does this sound like something you can relate to? If it’s not your job taking up your time, it’s something else. I am fascinated by how we see TIME. How much value we place on it. How we talk about it, think about it. How very little we understand it. It’s the most precious thing we have as humans and yet we have no idea how to manage it properly because we have such a small lens into what time is or does for us. Really here, in my scenario, which is a very true depiction of how I felt is not a result of there not actually being enough time. How can you say something takes too much time at the same time you say you have not enough time? See how silly this is? The issue is me blaming how I felt on time itself, which can’t actually be responsible for anything, because it doesn’t control anything. We are the ones in control.

In reality, I am just struggling to manage myself.

Not convinced? The story goes on…

I left my job (for many reasons), so now I should have all the time in the world, yes? Great! Only, I still was (am) feeling as though I don’t have “enough time” to get “everything done”.

How is this possible?

Let’s address what we’re really doing when we are using phrases such as “I don’t have enough time for that”. We have the tendency of needing to connect how we feel to some concrete piece of what we think is evidence of our feelings, but really, the “time”, or lack thereof, in this particular instance is just a scapegoat. Instead of allowing feelings to pass through us and just be felt for what they are, we need to anchor them to something else in order to essentially lay blame on something other than ourselves. In this case, it’s the lack of time that I am blaming my not getting to other things I wanted to do, which made me feel burnt out and frustrated. 

It’s not a matter of managing time, but managing ourselves. You cannot manage time, because you cannot change time, but you can change yourself. Until we can learn to manage ourselves, we can manage nothing else.

Why do people think they don’t have enough time?

Now, let’s talk about some reasons as to why people may feel as though they don’t have “enough time”. Essentially, these reasons can be attributed to a feeling of a lack of control. Those feelings cause us to then blame something for our lack of control. Again, it ends up being ‘time’. Here are the top reasons why people think they don’t have enough time.

  • They lack focus
  • They lack direction
  • They multi-task
  • They are not organized
  • They don’t prioritize
  • They don’t have a routine
  • They are unsure of their goals
  • They are negative and have poor attitudes
  • They focus on urgent rather than important

To sum it up: they don’t know how to manage themselves. That lack of control is a feeling. If we allow the feeling to be more than just that, it can become our reality. The good news is that we have the power to become in control. All we have to do is get a little better at managing ourselves. If it seems overwhelming, there’s really nothing to it! Once you have a clearer understanding of yourself, your goals, your priorities, your needs vs wants, etc, you will manage yourself, and thus your “time”, with ease.

Check out my other posts on dreams, self-reflection, and positive thoughts to gain inspiration!

Can you manage yourself? What will you do differently today?

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Photo by Ylanite Koppens on Pexels.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cover Photo by Moose Photos from Pexels

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